This is totally babies

Sep 02

great batman villain
or 
greatest batman villain

great batman villain

or 

greatest batman villain

[video]

hijinksensue:

Webcomics Worth Wreading review of HijiNKS ENSUE. 
This is a really well written and thoughtful review of my comic. I often cringe when I see reviews of my work pop up online, because I KNOW I am going to read them and I KNOW I am not going to like everything I read. Reviews of my work are often complimentary, but tend to zero in on the one or two aspects of my work that I am either insecure about or ashamed of. Even if those aspects are wading in a sea of compliments, I always get the feeling of “I was kind of hoping no one had noticed THAT,” or “maybe everyone forgot about THAT.” This review by Robynn Blume caused no such cringing on my part.
This isn’t to say it was sycophantic or brown nosing. Flaws are mentioned, but the author seems to have a genuine appreciation of the comic and the evolution it’s undertaken over the last 7 years. I’m happy to say, and she seems to agree, that most of the stuff I am not proud of (violence instead of punchlines, insensitive language, overly specific pop culture references that require you be ingesting the exact same media that I am exactly WHEN I am, lack of character depth, etc) are in the past. 
She details the various incarnations of HijiNKS ENSUE (the early pop culture years, the Lofi’s, the photo comics, the convention photo comics, and the current semi-autobio version) in a way that should give the uninitiated an easy to follow roadmap of a body of work that might otherwise seem unfocused or, at times, flailing (another one of those things I hoped people didn’t notice or remember). She points out that the archive system can be confusing to new readers and I agree. I separated the various types of comics into categories last year in an effort to give focus to the new stuff while not abandoning the old, but the usability of the actual menus and layout has always been confusing at best. The good news is I am redesigning the site and fixing this problem is one of the main things I am addressing. 
There are times (lots of times) that I feel like planning and ending for HijiNKS ENSUE and moving on to a different project. My audience splintered after I changed the comic’s format and I fear it will never fully recover. I tell myself that it’s not that no one “gets” what I’m trying to do (It’s not THAT ambitious or deep and I am not THAT deluded), it’s just that no one really cares. Of course, I know these fears are mostly overreactions (with some truth), and that some people do enjoy my work. It’s just really nice to see that someone, ANYONE really, honestly, truly GETS it. 
Thank you, Robynn for your thoughtful words, and for a much needed boost in confidence. 

hijinksensue:

Webcomics Worth Wreading review of HijiNKS ENSUE

This is a really well written and thoughtful review of my comic. I often cringe when I see reviews of my work pop up online, because I KNOW I am going to read them and I KNOW I am not going to like everything I read. Reviews of my work are often complimentary, but tend to zero in on the one or two aspects of my work that I am either insecure about or ashamed of. Even if those aspects are wading in a sea of compliments, I always get the feeling of “I was kind of hoping no one had noticed THAT,” or “maybe everyone forgot about THAT.” This review by Robynn Blume caused no such cringing on my part.

This isn’t to say it was sycophantic or brown nosing. Flaws are mentioned, but the author seems to have a genuine appreciation of the comic and the evolution it’s undertaken over the last 7 years. I’m happy to say, and she seems to agree, that most of the stuff I am not proud of (violence instead of punchlines, insensitive language, overly specific pop culture references that require you be ingesting the exact same media that I am exactly WHEN I am, lack of character depth, etc) are in the past. 

She details the various incarnations of HijiNKS ENSUE (the early pop culture years, the Lofi’s, the photo comics, the convention photo comics, and the current semi-autobio version) in a way that should give the uninitiated an easy to follow roadmap of a body of work that might otherwise seem unfocused or, at times, flailing (another one of those things I hoped people didn’t notice or remember). She points out that the archive system can be confusing to new readers and I agree. I separated the various types of comics into categories last year in an effort to give focus to the new stuff while not abandoning the old, but the usability of the actual menus and layout has always been confusing at best. The good news is I am redesigning the site and fixing this problem is one of the main things I am addressing. 

There are times (lots of times) that I feel like planning and ending for HijiNKS ENSUE and moving on to a different project. My audience splintered after I changed the comic’s format and I fear it will never fully recover. I tell myself that it’s not that no one “gets” what I’m trying to do (It’s not THAT ambitious or deep and I am not THAT deluded), it’s just that no one really cares. Of course, I know these fears are mostly overreactions (with some truth), and that some people do enjoy my work. It’s just really nice to see that someone, ANYONE really, honestly, truly GETS it. 

Thank you, Robynn for your thoughtful words, and for a much needed boost in confidence. 

[video]

christel-thoughts:

Perfect

christel-thoughts:

Perfect

(Source: thefangirlfeminist, via starline)

comicsalliance:

FUNKYWATCH: AUGUST 2014 WAS FUNKY WINTERBEAN & CRANKSHAFT’S MOST DEPRESSING EVER
By Chris Sims
Over the past 40 years, Tom Batiuk’s Funky Winkerbean has transitioned from a gag-a-day comic strip about a high school to an ongoing chronicle of pure, abject misery. Thanks to the ongoing commentary on Josh Fruhlinger’s Comics Curmudgeon, I am now completely obsessed with it, which is why I spend a little time every month rounding up its finest examples of crushing despair.
This month… oh brother, this month. Tom Batiuk’s offerings over the past few weeks have made August 2014, without question, the single worst and most mind-bogglingly bizarre month on record. If you haven’t been reading my recaps of the strip over the past few years, this is the one you’re going to want to start with, if only to see how completely irate one man can get over a newspaper comic strip about a man trying to write a made-for-cable movie about his dead wife.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

FUNKYWATCH: AUGUST 2014 WAS FUNKY WINTERBEAN & CRANKSHAFT’S MOST DEPRESSING EVER

By Chris Sims

Over the past 40 years, Tom Batiuk’s Funky Winkerbean has transitioned from a gag-a-day comic strip about a high school to an ongoing chronicle of pure, abject misery. Thanks to the ongoing commentary on Josh Fruhlinger’s Comics Curmudgeon, I am now completely obsessed with it, which is why I spend a little time every month rounding up its finest examples of crushing despair.

This month… oh brother, this month. Tom Batiuk’s offerings over the past few weeks have made August 2014, without question, the single worst and most mind-bogglingly bizarre month on record. If you haven’t been reading my recaps of the strip over the past few years, this is the one you’re going to want to start with, if only to see how completely irate one man can get over a newspaper comic strip about a man trying to write a made-for-cable movie about his dead wife.

READ MORE

thecaptivephantom said: I've recently learned that prior to like the 13th century, a lot of priests and bishops didn't really tend to their parishes or dioceses, and that there are stories of people, such as Archbishop Odo of Rouen, who traveled to "fix" lax practices in Christendom, once various reforms were made. Would you mind sharing some of your favourites of these stories (assuming you have some)?

benito-cereno:

While not 100% what you’re looking for, since it’s a story about relatively early Christianity in which a saint is converting pagans rather than rectifying church practices, my favorite traveling bishop story is the tale of Saint Martin of Tours and the pine tree, as related by Sulpicius Severus.

The short version is this:

Martin had traveled to a town and destroyed its pagan temple, but what was left was to destroy a pine tree that had been dedicated to the pagan god. The people of the town, who had stood by as the temple was destroyed got really incensed at the idea of the tree getting cut down. But Martin insisted, as the tree had been dedicated to what was, in his eyes, a demon.

So the people agreed, under one condition: they themselves would cut down the tree as long as Martin would stand under it. At this point, they would rather kill the guy who wanted to kill their tree than keep the tree itself. The tree was already leaning a little bit, so there was no doubt where it would fall. They tied Martin up and put him in this spot.

They began cutting down the tree, and Martin did not seem concerned at all. With a creak and a groan, the tree breaks and begins crashing towards the earth. Before it can reach Martin, however, the man of God makes the sign of the cross in the air, and the tree spins around like a top, falls backwards and nearly (but not quite) crushes the men who had cut it down.

Obviously everyone was super impressed by this and converted to Christianity immediately, hoping to gain their own tree-repelling superpowers.

rosalarian:

gastrophobia:

So, I got my digital copy of Smut Peddler 2 and just up and decided to make an ad for it.

This is perfection.

rosalarian:

gastrophobia:

So, I got my digital copy of Smut Peddler 2 and just up and decided to make an ad for it.

This is perfection.

[video]

zeroiasd said: Have you seen the later Japanese G1 stuff? Victory, Super-God Masterforce, and all that? If so, what's your opinion on them? Or Beast Wars II/Neo/Metals, same question.

What I think is that I’m not their target audience.  There’s not a lot to say beyond that.  It’s okay stuff but not what I’m into.